Iosevka is an open-source, sans-serif + slab-serif, monospace + quasi‑proportional typeface family, designed for writing code, using in terminals, and preparing technical documents.

Iosevka

Monospace

0
Weights
×
0
Slopes
×
0
Widths

Iosevka Term

Monospace

0
Weights
×
0
Slopes
×
0
Widths

Iosevka Fixed

Monospace, Ligation Off

0
Weights
×
0
Slopes
×
0
Widths

Iosevka Slab

Monospace

0
Weights
×
0
Slopes
×
0
Widths

Iosevka Term Slab

Monospace

0
Weights
×
0
Slopes
×
0
Widths

Iosevka Fixed Slab

Monospace, Ligation Off

0
Weights
×
0
Slopes
×
0
Widths

Iosevka Aile

Quasi-Proportional

0
Weights
×
0
Slopes

Iosevka Etoile

Quasi-Proportional

0
Weights
×
0
Slopes

Iosevka Sparkle

Quasi-Proportional

0
Weights
×
0
Slopes

Thin
ExtraLight
Light
Regular
Medium
SemiBold
Bold
ExtraBold
Heavy
Upright
Oblique
Italic
Normal
Extended
0
Characters Covered
0
Glyphs Included
0
Languages Supported
0
Character Variant Features
0
Stylistic Set Features
0
Ligation Sets

Spatial Efficient

The Iosevka’s monospace family is provided in a slender outfit by default: glyphs are exactly 1/2em wide. Compared to the competitors, you could fit more columns within the same screen width.

Iosevka provides two widths, Normal and Extended. If you prefer more breeze between the character, choose Extended and enjoy.

# UCD DATA Section
00B0 ; DEGREE SIGN                                ; So ; 0 ; ET ;                           ;  ;   ;     ; N ;                                   ;  ;      ;      ;     
00B1 ; PLUS-MINUS SIGN                            ; Sm ; 0 ; ET ;                           ;  ;   ;     ; N ; PLUS-OR-MINUS SIGN                ;  ;      ;      ;     
00B2 ; SUPERSCRIPT TWO                            ; No ; 0 ; EN ; <super> 0032              ;  ; 2 ; 2   ; N ; SUPERSCRIPT DIGIT TWO             ;  ;      ;      ;     
00B3 ; SUPERSCRIPT THREE                          ; No ; 0 ; EN ; <super> 0033              ;  ; 3 ; 3   ; N ; SUPERSCRIPT DIGIT THREE           ;  ;      ;      ;     
00B4 ; ACUTE ACCENT                               ; Sk ; 0 ; ON ; <compat> 0020 0301        ;  ;   ;     ; N ; SPACING ACUTE                     ;  ;      ;      ;     
00B5 ; MICRO SIGN                                 ; Ll ; 0 ; L  ; <compat> 03BC             ;  ;   ;     ; N ;                                   ;  ; 039C ;      ; 039C
00B6 ; PILCROW SIGN                               ; Po ; 0 ; ON ;                           ;  ;   ;     ; N ; PARAGRAPH SIGN                    ;  ;      ;      ;     
00B7 ; MIDDLE DOT                                 ; Po ; 0 ; ON ;                           ;  ;   ;     ; N ;                                   ;  ;      ;      ;     
00B8 ; CEDILLA                                    ; Sk ; 0 ; ON ; <compat> 0020 0327        ;  ;   ;     ; N ; SPACING CEDILLA                   ;  ;      ;      ;     
00B9 ; SUPERSCRIPT ONE                            ; No ; 0 ; EN ; <super> 0031              ;  ; 1 ; 1   ; N ; SUPERSCRIPT DIGIT ONE             ;  ;      ;      ;     
00BA ; MASCULINE ORDINAL INDICATOR                ; Lo ; 0 ; L  ; <super> 006F              ;  ;   ;     ; N ;                                   ;  ;      ;      ;     
00BB ; RIGHT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARK ; Pf ; 0 ; ON ;                           ;  ;   ;     ; Y ; RIGHT POINTING GUILLEMET          ;  ;      ;      ;     
00BC ; VULGAR FRACTION ONE QUARTER                ; No ; 0 ; ON ; <fraction> 0031 2044 0034 ;  ;   ; 1/4 ; N ; FRACTION ONE QUARTER              ;  ;      ;      ;     
00BD ; VULGAR FRACTION ONE HALF                   ; No ; 0 ; ON ; <fraction> 0031 2044 0032 ;  ;   ; 1/2 ; N ; FRACTION ONE HALF                 ;  ;      ;      ;     
00BE ; VULGAR FRACTION THREE QUARTERS             ; No ; 0 ; ON ; <fraction> 0033 2044 0034 ;  ;   ; 3/4 ; N ; FRACTION THREE QUARTERS           ;  ;      ;      ;     
00BF ; INVERTED QUESTION MARK                     ; Po ; 0 ; ON ;                           ;  ;   ;     ; N ;                                   ;  ;      ;      ;     
00C0 ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH GRAVE          ; Lu ; 0 ; L  ; 0041 0300                 ;  ;   ;     ; N ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A GRAVE      ;  ;      ; 00E0 ;     
00C1 ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH ACUTE          ; Lu ; 0 ; L  ; 0041 0301                 ;  ;   ;     ; N ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A ACUTE      ;  ;      ; 00E1 ;     
00C2 ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH CIRCUMFLEX     ; Lu ; 0 ; L  ; 0041 0302                 ;  ;   ;     ; N ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A CIRCUMFLEX ;  ;      ; 00E2 ;     
00C3 ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH TILDE          ; Lu ; 0 ; L  ; 0041 0303                 ;  ;   ;     ; N ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A TILDE      ;  ;      ; 00E3 ;     
00C4 ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH DIAERESIS      ; Lu ; 0 ; L  ; 0041 0308                 ;  ;   ;     ; N ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A DIAERESIS  ;  ;      ; 00E4 ;     
00C5 ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH RING ABOVE     ; Lu ; 0 ; L  ; 0041 030A                 ;  ;   ;     ; N ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A RING       ;  ;      ; 00E5 ;     
00C6 ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER AE                    ; Lu ; 0 ; L  ;                           ;  ;   ;     ; N ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A E          ;  ;      ; 00E6 ;     
00C7 ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER C WITH CEDILLA        ; Lu ; 0 ; L  ; 0043 0327                 ;  ;   ;     ; N ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER C CEDILLA    ;  ;      ; 00E7 ;     
00C8 ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER E WITH GRAVE          ; Lu ; 0 ; L  ; 0045 0300                 ;  ;   ;     ; N ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER E GRAVE      ;  ;      ; 00E8 ;     
00C9 ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER E WITH ACUTE          ; Lu ; 0 ; L  ; 0045 0301                 ;  ;   ;     ; N ; LATIN CAPITAL LETTER E ACUTE      ;  ;      ; 00E9 ;

Code and Terminal

Terminal emulators have a stricter compatibility requirements for fonts. Therefore, Iosevka and Iosevka Slab all contain two specialized families, Term and Fixed, targeting terminal users.

In these families, the symbols will be narrower to follow terminals’ ideology of column count. In the Fixed families, the ligation will be disabled to ensure better compatibility in certain environments.

Iosevka

{ n } 🅇(n) -> [n] ▢△◈

Iosevka Term

{ n } 🅇(n) -> [n] ▢△◈

Iosevka Fixed

{ n } 🅇(n) -> [n] ▢△◈

Variants à la Carte

Iosevka provides 357817599295097678069760000 possible variants in their monospace families. There are 184 character variant features and 15 stylistic sets. You can either select one pre-defined stylistic set, or cherry-pick your flavor.

@real fox.quick(h){ *is_brown && it_jumps_over(dogs.lazy) }
0123456789 ABC.DEF.GHI.JKL.MNO.PQRS.TUV.WXYZ ß <= ¶^$#% >=
export function longestCommonSeq(wordX: string, wordY: string) {
const m = wordX.length;
const n = wordY.length;
const l: Array<Array<number>> = [];
for (let i = 0; i <= m; i++) {
l[i] = [];
for (let j = 0; j <= n; j++) {
l[i][j] = 0;
}
}
for (let i = 0; i <= m; i++) {
for (let j = 0; j <= n; j++) {
if (i === 0 || j === 0) {
l[i][j] = 0;
} else if (wordX[i - 1] === wordY[j - 1]) {
l[i][j] = l[i - 1][j - 1] + 1;
} else {
const a = l[i - 1][j];
const b = l[i][j - 1];
l[i][j] = a > b ? a : b; // max(a,b)
}
}
}
return l[m][n];
}

Ligations for Coding

Iosevka’s monospace families supports not only one ligation set, but also language-specific ligations. Enable the corresponded OpenType feature in your editor, and the correct ligation will appear.

Leveraging advanced OpenType techniques, Iosevka also supports long ligatures like long arrows or horizontal bars built up with equal signs.

Use this variant in CSS

your-selector {
    font-feature-settings: "calt" on;
}
<-- <--- <<- <- <-> -> ->> --> ---> <!--
-<< -< -<- ->- >- >>- <--> <---> <---->
<== <=== <<= <= <=> => =>> ==> ===> <!---
=<< =< =<= =>= >= >>= <==> <===> <====>
<------- -------> <======> <~~ <~ ~> ~~>
\/ /\ == != /= ~= <> === !== =/= =!=
:= :- :+ <* <*> *> <| <|> |> +: -: =:
:: ::: <. <.> .> (* comm *) ++ +++ |- -|

For Every Writing

The three quasi-proportional families: Iosevka Aile, Iosevka Etoile, and Iosevka Sparkle, are designed targeting documentation preparation and writing. They provide more variety on character widths, including a slightly wider letter w and m, and narrower i and l.

AMONG the many valuable contributions of William Dwight Whitney to linguistic science is one especially important and fundamental principle. It may be stated in these words. In explaining the prehistoric phenomena of language we must assume no other factors than those which we are able to observe and estimate in the historical period of language development. The factors that produced changes in human speech five thousand or ten thousand years ago cannot have been essentially different from those which are now operating to transform living languages. On the basis of this principle we look to-day at a much-discussed problem of Indo-European philology with views very different from the views held by the founders of Comparative Philology and their immediate successors. I refer to the problem, how the Indo-European people came to assign gender to nouns, to distinguish between masculine, feminine, and neuter. This question is of interest to others besides philologists. What man of culture who has learned languages such as the Greek, Latin, or French has not at times wondered that objects which have no possible connection with the natural gender of animals appear constantly in the language as male or female? In German, for example, it is der fuss, but die hand; der geist, but die seele; in Latin, hīc hortus, hīc animus, hīc amor, but haec planta, haec anima, haec felicitas; in Greek, ὁ πλοῦτος, ὁ οἶκος, but ἡ πενία, ἡ οἰκία.
This gender distinction pervades all the older Indo-European languages, and must therefore be regarded as having its origin in the time of the pro-ethnic Indo-European community. Not only is the subject itself full of interest, but also the treatment it has received from the philological research of our century. The various efforts made to solve the problem may very aptly illustrate an essential difference which exists between the theories of language development held in the beginning and middle of this century and those which prevail to-day, — a difference of method existing not in comparative linguistics alone, but also in other fields of philological and historical research that border on it.

162 Languages Supported

  • Afrikaans
  • Aghem
  • Akan
  • Albanian
  • Asturian
  • Asu
  • Azerbaijani
  • Bafia
  • Bambara
  • Basaa
  • Basque
  • Belarusian
  • Bemba
  • Bena
  • Bosnian
  • Breton
  • Bulgarian
  • Catalan
  • Cebuano
  • Central Atlas Tamazight
  • Chechen
  • Chiga
  • Colognian
  • Cornish
  • Croatian
  • Czech
  • Danish
  • Duala
  • Dutch
  • Embu
  • English
  • Esperanto
  • Estonian
  • Ewe
  • Ewondo
  • Faroese
  • Filipino
  • Finnish
  • French
  • Friulian
  • Fulah
  • Galician
  • Ganda
  • German
  • Greek
  • Gusii
  • Hausa
  • Hawaiian
  • Hungarian
  • Icelandic
  • Igbo
  • Inari Sami
  • Indonesian
  • Interlingua
  • Irish
  • Italian
  • Javanese
  • Jola-Fonyi
  • Kabuverdianu
  • Kabyle
  • Kako
  • Kalaallisut
  • Kalenjin
  • Kamba
  • Kazakh
  • Kikuyu
  • Kinyarwanda
  • Koyra Chiini
  • Koyraboro Senni
  • Kurdish
  • Kwasio
  • Kyrgyz
  • Lakota
  • Langi
  • Latvian
  • Lingala
  • Lithuanian
  • Low German
  • Lower Sorbian
  • Luba-Katanga
  • Luo
  • Luxembourgish
  • Luyia
  • Macedonian
  • Machame
  • Makhuwa-Meetto
  • Makonde
  • Malagasy
  • Malay
  • Maltese
  • Manx
  • Maori
  • Masai
  • Meru
  • Metaʼ
  • Mongolian
  • Morisyen
  • Mundang
  • Nama
  • Ngiemboon
  • Nigerian Pidgin
  • North Ndebele
  • Northern Sami
  • Norwegian Bokmål
  • Norwegian Nynorsk
  • Nuer
  • Nyankole
  • Oromo
  • Ossetic
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Prussian
  • Quechua
  • Romanian
  • Romansh
  • Rombo
  • Rundi
  • Russian
  • Rwa
  • Sakha
  • Samburu
  • Sango
  • Sangu
  • Scottish Gaelic
  • Sena
  • Serbian
  • Shambala
  • Shona
  • Slovak
  • Slovenian
  • Soga
  • Somali
  • Spanish
  • Sundanese
  • Swahili
  • Swedish
  • Swiss German
  • Tachelhit (shi_latn)
  • Taita
  • Tajik
  • Tasawaq
  • Tatar
  • Teso
  • Tongan
  • Turkish
  • Turkmen
  • Ukrainian
  • Upper Sorbian
  • Uzbek
  • Vai (vai_latn)
  • Vietnamese
  • Volapük
  • Vunjo
  • Walser
  • Welsh
  • Western Frisian
  • Wolof
  • Xhosa
  • Yangben
  • Yoruba
  • Zarma
  • Zulu